ENGOMA ENTEERA

Posted By : peterjarvis
Piece Title : Engoma Enteera
No. of times Viewed (August 2017) :8
Total No. of times Viewed :588
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Composer / Arranger : Tamusuza, Justinian
Composer / Arranger Details: Justinian Tamusuza was born in 1951 in Kibisi, Uganda in East Africa. His early musical training was in Kigandan traditional music: singing, playing drums and tube-fiddle, endingidi. He studied with the Reverend Anthony Okelo and with Kevin Volans at Queens University in Belfast, Ireland. He received his doctorate in composition at Northwestern University in Evanston, Illinois as a student of Alan Stout. Tamusuza served from 1993 to 1995 as a member of the Music Jury of the International Society of Contemporary Music, ISCM. He is the African representative for the Composers Guild of New Jersey and was most recently a member of the International Council for africa95. Tamusuza was the Artistic Director of the africa95 African Composers Workshop in the United Kingdom, hosted by the Royal Liverpool Philharmonic Orchestra and the Liverpool University in November, 1995. Tamusuza has taught music composition, theory and analysis at the Department of Music, Dance and Drama at Makerere University in Uganda and has also held a professorship at the School of Music at Northwestern University.
Total Number of Percussionists Required :1 Percussionist(s)
Categories : Timpani
Instrument / Discipline :
Instrumentation : Cow Bell
Range of Instruments / Number of Drums :
Written for / Commissioned by : Composed for Peter Jarvis commissioned by Calabrese Brothers Music
Permission given for Youtube video by Copyright holder
and Youtube Channel Owner. Recorded / Provided by:
 Unknown
Accompanied :N/A
Publisher :Calabrese Brothers Music, LLC
Publishers Website :www.calabresebrothersmusic.com
Publisher Details : Publishes contemporary composers
Year Composed / Copyright Date :2005 / 
Duration :6Minutes
No. of Mallets/Sticks Required :2
Special Needs :
Sheet Music Available From :www.calabresebrothersmusic.com/      Check to see if in stock
Programme Notes / Performance Details :Engoma Enteera was commissioned by Calabrese Brothers Music and is dedicated to Peter Jarvis.
In my ethnic music terminology "Engoma Enteera" means drum music without dancing and singing. The work is based on two drum styles of my ethnic music:
(a) The Baakisimba drum rhythm (measures 1-65, 77-153, and 168-180); which accompanies the Baakisimba Dance. The dance is both for the Kabaka (king of Buganda) and the Bakopi (commoners of Buganda). The two are characterized by the compound duple meter; and the difference is in both the choreographic formations and tempi. I did not make such distinctions in this work because there is neither dancing nor singing.
(b) The Ebiggu drum rhythm (measures 66-76 and 154-167) mainly accompanies traditional religious ceremonies; and is usually in simple duple meter. The music is used by the traditional medicine people to get possessed after which they invoke emizimu (spirits of the ancestors) or lubaale (traditional gods) to come and solve the problems in society.
I employed a pentatonic scale, which is close to the equidistant pentatonic scale of my ethnic music; and I employed two reference tones: F (measures 1-65, 148-180), and C (measures 66-147). Though the music has no functional tonality, I used the reference tones for tonal variety. The staff notation, and use of dynamics and their shades is the influence I got from my training in western music. Measures 144-147 is characteristic of polymetricism common in my ethnic music.
The metric speed in the four sections should be the same. Although there must not be tempo changes throughout the performance, a listener should be able to hear the metric changes. This is another characteristic of my ethnic music depicted in this work.
- Justinian Tamusuza August 19, 2008 - Performance note: This piece is very hard and contains many pitch changes. I have found that in order to negotiate the many pitch changes, is best to use 6 drums 3 of which do not require retuning during the piece. - Pete Jarvis
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